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Greek VS Aramaic Bible Versions -The First Impediment

Interesting post on the importance of understanding the meanings of words in the right context and the perils of mistranslation. I never knew the Aramaic word for God is both masculine and feminine – gives new depths to the teachings…

Waking The Infinite

Recently I shared with you a project I undertook as the result of a realization I had during the course of my early awakening related to early Christian texts and how it was that I saw a big elephant in the room that had managed not to make its way to the canonical Gospels. 

My first big question as I made this realization was “why?” The answer has pulled in a number of reasons, not just one, which is one reason why I have been moved to undertake this project. It is a fascinating story, and it helps to bring early Christian thought back to where it needs to be, in my estimation, which is a complete system not only for being, but for becoming more than we thought possible. 

The first, and perhaps most important layer or impediment to deeper realization of what Christ was teaching is…

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Are you waiting for a new idea to cut you free from your entanglement?

This is a beautiful extract from Divine Beauty by John O’Donohue about the beauty of thought, what it reveals and how it gives rise to forms in imagination. We often believe we have to ‘get rid of thoughts’ on the spiritual path, but this passage brings a new perspective… “It is one of the lovely ironies… Continue reading Are you waiting for a new idea to cut you free from your entanglement?

Addled Articles

Karen Armstrong on Mysticism and being a Mystic (or not)

“Men and women may express their faith in different terms, but there is an underlying and profound similarity beneath all the differences. We now realise that the great religions of the world are not monolithic institutions but that they all contain several spiritualities – many of which are found right across the board of the… Continue reading Karen Armstrong on Mysticism and being a Mystic (or not)

Addled Articles

The Gift of Fearlessness

Fascinating insight into the real world of Zen and what it takes to become fearless…

Mind Without Walls

“Do not look upon this world with fear and loathing.

Bravely face whatever the gods offer.” -Morehei Ueshiba

I trained in a lineage of Rinzai Zen for three years and I consider my teacher there to be among the finest human beings alive today, a feat largely attributable to decades of hard Zen training. A good friend of mine who is much my senior and also trained in a related lineage (lots of strong personalities, politics and break-aways in the real world of Zen) as personal attendant to a man named Tanouye Roshi filled me in a bit about this deceased Roshi’s history, practice and the nature of his awakening. I believe this perspective on training and practice is valuable and inspiring to any serious student seeking a major opening, seeking enlightenment.

Our Buddha nature is awakened through our bodies, as our bodies are the gateway. In this lineage, these awakenings are…

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Reluctant Mystic: from Atheist to Agnostic

I started life as a default atheist. My family weren’t religious and spirituality wasn’t part of my daily life. I never thought about it or questioned it. Unlike America, the UK and Europe are mostly secular. In the UK, if you admit to believing in God, or even being mildly curious, people tend to assume… Continue reading Reluctant Mystic: from Atheist to Agnostic

Addled Articles

A History of Addled

How I wrote the book and how it changed: from idea to publication.

I never wanted to be a writer. I didn’t fantasise about seeing my words in print or imagine adoring fans hanging on my every word. I believed I was an inarticulate musician and sound engineer. Writing anything would simply confirm my deepest fears: that I was stupid. So it was quite a surprise to find myself, in my early 30s, with a head full of stories all demanding attention and expression. Continue reading →